http://www.fastcodesign.com/3033511/fast-feed/why-google-killed-your-favorite-feature

One thing that’s almost always guaranteed with product design: when you add a feature, no one complains about it outright; if they don’t love it they mostly just ignore it. Whereas if you take something away, you’ll hear about it if people relied upon it . . . loudly and often. With something like Google Search, even if just a small fraction of people miss a feature and an even smaller fraction says so, that can still be tens of thousands of people. It can seem like a tidal wave of opposition to the removal: “look at all these people who want it back!”

So it would be much easier to leave in everything that’s ever launched. But then you end up with bloatware: an unwieldy array of ill-fitting modules that don’t work well with newer technologies (e.g., the shift to smartphones, or upgraded security, or touch screens, etc.) and don’t really serve most of your users well either. And nothing comes for free--every feature must be maintained, supported in multiple languages, on multiple devices, and the additional complexity must be accounted for in testing so that the entire service remains reliable. And that cost gets balanced against the impact: is this feature solving an important problem for lots of people?

There are many, many such features that you always have to make tough choices about. We’ve actually cut features that I love. This is one of the toughest but most important parts of designing products--deciding what to trim as you move forward. Sometimes you over-trim--we work to measure the impact and aim to strike the right balance. Sometimes we get it wrong, so it is important that people speak up. We really do listen, and we prioritize according to what seems to satisfy the widest needs given our capabilities.

administrator | Sunday 27 July 2014 - 11:54 pm | | Default | No comments

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/27/magazine/why-do-americans-stink-at-math.html&hn=1?_r=0

One of the most vivid arithmetic failings displayed by Americans occurred in the early 1980s, when the A&W restaurant chain released a new hamburger to rival the McDonald’s Quarter Pounder. With a third-pound of beef, the A&W burger had more meat than the Quarter Pounder; in taste tests, customers preferred A&W’s burger. And it was less expensive. A lavish A&W television and radio marketing campaign cited these benefits. Yet instead of leaping at the great value, customers snubbed it.

Only when the company held customer focus groups did it become clear why. The Third Pounder presented the American public with a test in fractions. And we failed. Misunderstanding the value of one-third, customers believed they were being overcharged. Why, they asked the researchers, should they pay the same amount for a third of a pound of meat as they did for a quarter-pound of meat at McDonald’s. The “4” in “¼,” larger than the “3” in “⅓,” led them astray.

administrator | Sunday 27 July 2014 - 11:50 pm | | Default | No comments

geocdn, aerospike

http://www.scalescale.com/rolling-your-own-cdn-build-a-3-continent-cdn-for-25-in-1-hour/

http://www.aerospike.com/blog/entrepreneurs-break-all-the-rules-aerospike-goes-open-source/

administrator | Sunday 27 July 2014 - 10:28 pm | | Default | No comments